Social Kitchen

Location of ArtHouse Gary provides opportunity for local businesses by ArtHouse Gary

In recent years, the downtown area of Gary has been undergoing somewhat of a revitalization. The implementation of a minor league baseball stadium, some new public art installations and technology-based business ventures has brought more and more people back to visiting the Steel City.

With the addition of ArtHouse to Gary’s downtown area, even more possibilities for events and gatherings are on the horizon. ArtHouse will offer an art gallery space for local and regional artists to display their work and a pop-up café for home cooks to make their signature dishes for members of the community. During times when the building isn’t being used as gallery space a café, it can be rented out as a community resource serving as a premier venue in a downtown location. The food and supplies for all of these functions could be provided by local farmers and grocery stores that wish to partner with ArtHouse.

Many ideas for community use of the building have been generated by the partners of ArtHouse. For example, the space can be utilized as an accessible commercial training kitchen for emerging businesses. It can also be used to hold other culinary operations or host community dinners for Gary residents. These functions would be serviced by local individuals participating in the ArtHouse job training program and all would have the need to be supplied by local vendors.

There have also been discussions surrounding the possibility of hosting family recipe feature events. Local home cooks could showcase some of their recipes with other members of the community via a demonstration and tasting.

The location of ArtHouse is what makes it ideal for these types of gatherings and events and others. It is in the downtown area and is not far off the highway; perfect for grabbing a bite to eat before or after a baseball game or meeting up with friends and family traveling in from out of town. Those traveling to ArtHouse would get to experience what NWI farmers and grocers have to offer.

To get a feel for what ArtHouse is all about or to learn about becoming a supplier for ArtHouse events, visit the grand opening on November 19 from 4-6 p.m. For more information, check out www.ArtHouseGary.com.

Gary residents experience indoor and outdoor dining at ArtHouse by ArtHouse Gary

There are not currently many dining options in Gary. When residents want a night out, they must often travel to Merrillville or Hobart. This is just not feasible, especially for those taking public transportation. ArtHouse: A Social Kitchen looks to give Gary diners a new option that is much closer to home.

ArtHouse opens to the public on November 19 and will offer a dining space set inside of an art gallery. In addition to offering gallery dining, ArtHouse will have outdoor seating where guests can enjoy their food and drink in the summer months. This combination makes ArtHouse a truly unmatched destination for Gary diners.

Although outdoor dining can only happen when the weather is warm, ArtHouse plans to utilize the space for season-specific activities in the future. For example, the November 19 grand opening will feature fire pits for guests to toast marshmallows after their tour of the facility.

Perhaps one of the most unique aspects of ArtHouse is the plan for who will be cooking the food. ArtHouse will serve as a culinary business incubator for individuals in the community who may be looking to begin mass-producing and selling their signature dishes. Diners will have the opportunity to choose from a menu of offerings by the home cooks, giving them a true taste of the city of Gary.

 Mark your calendar for the grand opening of ArtHouse on November 19 to be one of the first to experience the newest food and art space in Gary! Visit www.ArtHouseGary.com for more information.

ArtHouse is more than just a building by ArtHouse Gary

It’s obvious of course that a house is a building structure, and a kitchen is typically part of a house. Gary’s ArtHouse: A Social Kitchen is so much more than simply a combination of those words, and while the finished work is now a place for artists and the community to gather in a warm and engaging environment, the behind the scenes labor that went into creating this space should not be taken for granted.

ArtHouse, located at 411 E. 5th Avenue in Gary, started as an idea, to create a space that would eventually house the recipe by which art will be embraced, appreciated and nurtured, much like food from your own kitchen. Careful planning went into the building and logistics of ArtHouse, details that the average person doesn’t think about. From the hard work of carefully selected Gary residents, who were handpicked in part because of their dedication to helping rebuild the Gary community, ArtHouse became a reality.

It’s been said that “it’s the little things that count.” Ask Kitty Aleman, who has been responsible, as part of a team, for cleaning the chairs and keeping the seat covers looking nice. Kitty joined the ArtHouse project via the recommendation of another member of the community.

Grisela Estrella, who owns a hot dog stand in Griffith, is putting her sewing skills to use to help support the ArtHouse initiatives. Grisela handles reupholstering of the furniture at ArtHouse and mentioned that she “visualizes ArtHouse as a place to feel safe, interact and socialize” and believes that it will revitalize the community.

ArtHouse is also inspiring families to work together. Janet Plant, along with two of her children, Randy and Latwon, each have a special role at ArtHouse. While Janet—who sees this as a good start for the community—helps with cleaning and the overall planning for ArtHouse, Randy and Latwon are busy with more of the heavy-duty work.

Randy Plant volunteers his skills in basic construction and “anything else” he can help with. He stated that he feels good about the revitalization of Gary and sees ArtHouse as “a big opportunity.” Randy, who is also a photographer, hopes to display some of his work at ArtHouse.

Latwon Plant, who handles cleaning, polishing, and unloading of materials from the trucks, considers ArtHouse as a great place for all ages. He has even brought his daughter in on occasion to help. He believes that ArtHouse “will breathe a lot of life” into the Gary community.

ArtHouse reminds us of the importance of a community working together. This sets a positive example, and it also shows that the work of rebuilding a community is not just about the building itself but about the spirit of collaboration and sharing a common vision. ArtHouse is positioned to be a major part of Gary’s revitalization.

For more information about ArtHouse, visit www.ArtHouseGary.com. Don’t forget to attend the grand opening celebration of ArtHouse on November 19 from 4-6 p.m. Get a sneak peak of some of the artwork, take a tour of the facilities to gain an appreciation for all the hard work that has gone into creating ArtHouse, and savor some of the flavors from local chefs.

 

ArtHouse: A Social Kitchen to officially open its doors on November 19 by ArtHouse Gary

Join fellow members of the Gary community as ArtHouse: A Social Kitchen prepares to celebrate its grand opening on Saturday, November 19 from 4-6 p.m. ArtHouse is a new business entity, located at 411 E. 5th Avenue in Gary that will serve as a multi-dimensional structure and seeks to spark revitalization for the city of Gary.

Supporters of ArtHouse, including investors Bloomberg Philanthropies and the Knight Foundation believe that it will provide a positive reflection on Gary and that it will offer resources for further community and economic development while inspiring more of an appreciation for public art.

ArtHouse has been described as “a unique destination for food, culture and art.” Those who attend the grand opening can expect to experience just that. The grand opening celebration will feature musical performances by G-B'z (God Brothaz) Entertainment and Anointed Voices Choir. They will have an opportunity to meet artists Ripple & Wilson, along with Theaster Gates Jr, who is the Artistic Director on the project. Mayor Karen Freeman-Wilson will also be present.

Food will be available for purchase from several local vendors including Mama Pearls, which is a partner in the project and is housed in the same building as ArtHouse. Silver Box and Cool Runnings food trucks will also sell food, and two local culinary artists will be featuring and providing some of their dessert specialties.

Come see for yourself what all the buzz is about as ArtHouse prepares for its launch into being part of Gary’s revitalization. View the artwork, take a tour, and savor in the flavors that will be onsite. In the meantime, visit www.ArtHouseGary.com for more information.

BLOOMBERG PHILANTHROPIES PRODUCES SHORT DOCUMENTARIES HIGHLIGHTING PUBLIC ART CHALLENGE PROJECTS IN GARY, IN; LOS ANGELES, CA; SPARTANBURG, SC AND NEW YORK CAPITAL REGION by ArtHouse Gary

NEW YORK – September 15, 2016 – A short documentary series created by Bloomberg Philanthropies provide a behind- the-scenes look at how four cities are using temporary public art projects to bring together local government and artists to increase access to the arts, elevate critical issues, foster community engagement and highlight creativity across local industries through the Bloomberg Philanthropies Public Art Challenge. Each of the three-minute shorts, which feature interviews with mayors, artists and cultural leaders working together to develop risk-taking public art projects, showcases the unprecedented levels of contact and cooperation between the arts and civic leaders.

Created to show the challenges and ambitions behind the cities selected to participate in the foundation’s Public Art Challenge, the video series can be viewed on YouTube via the hyperlinked titles below. Additionally, these and other videos are available on bloomberg.org.

ArtHouse: A Social Kitchen   In this video, Gary, Indiana Mayor Karen Freeman-Wilson discusses the economic, political and social challenges that have affected the city and introduces a culinary and visual arts center conceived by artist Theaster Gates with an innovative approach to addressing the complex challenges facing Gary.

ArtHouse: A Social Kitchen

In this video, Gary, Indiana Mayor Karen Freeman-Wilson discusses the economic, political and social challenges that have affected the city and introduces a culinary and visual arts center conceived by artist Theaster Gates with an innovative approach to addressing the complex challenges facing Gary.

Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light   Spartanburg, South Carolina’s project uses public art to promote crime prevention and as a catalyst for building police-community relations. As interviews with police officers show in this documentary, the light-based project, designed by artist Erwin Redl, is already bringing together residents and law enforcement officials.

Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light

Spartanburg, South Carolina’s project uses public art to promote crime prevention and as a catalyst for building police-community relations. As interviews with police officers show in this documentary, the light-based project, designed by artist Erwin Redl, is already bringing together residents and law enforcement officials.

Breathing Lights   Interviews with artist Adam Frelin and architect Barbara Nelson describe a multi-city light project that will engage residents, community organizations, local government, and private sector partners to address issues of divestment and building vacancy throughout Albany, Schenectady, and Troy, New York.

Breathing Lights

Interviews with artist Adam Frelin and architect Barbara Nelson describe a multi-city light project that will engage residents, community organizations, local government, and private sector partners to address issues of divestment and building vacancy throughout Albany, Schenectady, and Troy, New York.

CURRENT: LA Water   Los Angeles’ first-ever public art biennial included 13 artists presenting challenging ideas around the topic of water. In this video, Danielle Brazell, manager of Los Angeles’ Department of Cultural Affairs, and participating artists explain how the arts and creativity can be deployed to change perceptions and behavior around one of the city’s most pressing issues.

CURRENT: LA Water

Los Angeles’ first-ever public art biennial included 13 artists presenting challenging ideas around the topic of water. In this video, Danielle Brazell, manager of Los Angeles’ Department of Cultural Affairs, and participating artists explain how the arts and creativity can be deployed to change perceptions and behavior around one of the city’s most pressing issues.

Bloomberg Philanthropies has supported innovative public art projects in cities around the world. On October 13, 2014 Bloomberg Philanthropies announced the launch of the Public Art Challenge, a new program to fund temporary public art projects in cities across the U.S.  The foundation invited mayors in cities with 30,000 residents or more to submit proposals for innovative temporary public art projects that have the potential to catalyze urban growth, promote creativity, drive local economy, and add to the vibrancy of cities.  Submissions for visual and performing arts, including multimedia installations, were considered.

Out of 237 city applications, the cities of Gary, IN; Los Angeles, CA; Spartanburg, SC; and a partnership between Albany, Troy and Schenectady, NY were awarded $1 million from Bloomberg Philanthropies’ Public Art Challenge to execute their projects. The Los Angeles’ project CURRENT: LA Water ran from July 16 – August 14, while the other cities will open in the fall. 

About Bloomberg Philanthropies

Bloomberg Philanthropies works in over 120 countries to ensure better, longer lives for the greatest number of people. The organization focuses on five key areas for creating lasting change: Public Health, Government Innovation, Environment, Education, and the Arts. Bloomberg Philanthropies encompasses all of Michael R. Bloomberg’s charitable activities, including his foundation and his personal giving.

In 2015 Bloomberg Philanthropies distributed over half a billion dollars. For more information, please visit bloomberg.org or follow us on FacebookInstagramSnapchat, and Twitter @BloombergDotOrg.

 

Press Contact:

Rebecca Carriero, +1-212-205-0182, Rebeccac@bloomberg.org